Tasha running by the river side

My Running Journey to 100k for Guide Dogs UK

Remember when I said I was running 100k for charity and your jaws probably dropped just as much as mine did?! Well, believe it or not, I have now completed the challenge. My plan was to run 5k a day for 20 days in July to raise £100 a couple of days before my grandad’s birthday. However, I managed to finish the run 3 days early. Those 17 days (+2 rest days) have taught me a few things. So, I am going to talk about those along with answering a few questions Guide Dogs UK have asked me.

Why did I choose to fundraise for Guide Dogs UK?

In the earlier years of his life, grandad used to visit Henshaws every Wednesday afternoon on Talbot Road in Stretford. He helped out there with various projects to support people with sight loss and other disabilities. Another thing I recently learned from my mum is that, grandad visited the Disabled Living Centre, to pick up some kitchen gadgets such as alarm assisted mugs etc. that had been donated to Henshaws. I currently work for Disabled Living and I remember the feeling I had when I was accepted there. It turns out the link between my charity work and disabilities is even stronger now I know this.

The past few months, me and mum have been reminiscing about loads of different memories of my grandad to the point where I wondered what charity challenge I could do next.

I was browsing through the Guide Dogs UK website and found that the 100 for 100 challenge was live between 1st July – November 2020. Of course, my mind immediately thought, “Ooo let’s give this a go!” and that’s when I made the decision to carry out the challenge in July and it fit nicely around his birthday (today, 22nd July).

Guide Dogs UK is an amazing charity and one which meant a lot to my grandad. The charity supports blind people and those who are partially sighted. When grandad was alive, as soon as he found out he was partially sighted, he decided to sponsor a Labrador puppy and I still have the little teddy called Angel which he received in one of his ‘Sponsor a Puppy’ packs. He also went on a 5-day training course with Guide Dogs UK and was offered the chance to have his own guide dog but he thought as he had the support of his family around him, a guide dog would give someone who lived alone the help and comfort they needed.

How well did I tackle the challenge?

Tasha running down the road in the rain

Running in the rain

I may have finished the run early due to some routes being longer than others but it doesn’t mean that I breezed through it so easily. The hardest part of it all was the middle stage – back and shin aches. Knowing that I had ran so far but still had the other half of the hurdle to complete made me worry if I could actually do it.

The piece of advice I would give to anyone completing any challenge is, to not doubt yourself. Tell yourself you can do it and you will. Also, don’t forget to create a music playlist which encourages you to keep going. There’s nothing wrong with taking breaks along the way and changing your pace. For me, it wasn’t about speed, I just knew I would get there and that some days were going to be tougher than others. My biggest motivator was Danny. Each day I came home after running, he said, “How was it? I’m proud of you.”

The best thing about this particular challenge is that I did it alone (other than 3 occasions where I had some company). It helped me find more confidence in myself and not to be afraid. I’ll admit, as sad as it sounds, I did have a few tears strolling down my face as I approached the end of my running journey but it was only because A) I proved to myself I could finish it and B) when it’s someone you love and miss, it’s bound to be at least, a little emotional. Grandad may not have been there at the end of the road in person but I did visit him and granny every other day as I went by the cemetery.

How did I exceed my fundraising target?

running route map on the MapMyRun app

The last day of running for the 100k

I think the main reason I exceeded my fundraising target was due to lots of social media promotion across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. And of course, without the generosity of my lovely supporters who donated to my page, I wouldn’t have reached over 300% of my target.

The importance of supporting Guide Dogs UK

If you have a family member or friend who lives/has lived with sight loss or visual impairments, why not think of challenge you could do this year for Guide Dogs UK? Or perhaps you would like to offer your skills and volunteer for them. Take a look at their website to see how you can help. Visit: https://www.guidedogs.org.uk/how-you-can-help

running trainers on path

Finding a Love for Running Continues…

Running – some love it and some hate it. I never classed myself as a ‘runner’ until I started to beyond the professional and competitive side. I started to enjoy running more once I did it in my own time and noticed the many benefits along the way for my own body. Up until June this year, I hadn’t ran since March on the treadmill in the gym. Due to the mixture of lockdown, feeling sluggish and having quite low thoughts, I needed to do something. I wanted to find something to focus on. That’s when I realised that I could try to discover a new running journey.

You might ask, how did I get into running?

Back in school I always took part in the relay for Sports Day and 100 metre sprints here and there. I didn’t hate cross country but I wouldn’t say I loved it neither. As for the bleep test, I weirdly looked forward to that because I always up for a challenge to see how far I could push myself.

Fast forward a few years, I’m onto a few cardio workouts in the gym. Nothing too strenuous but a fair bit to keep myself fit. Alongside the cross trainer and treadmill, I absolutely love strength workouts, particular strengthening my legs and arms. Now those, I really miss!

Some of you may already know that fundraising for charity isn’t new to me. Over the years I have fundraised for St Ann’s Hospice, Tommy’s, Alzheimer’s Society, British Heart Foundation, and Cancer Research UK. Two of these occasions included participating in a running event. So, it comes as no surprise that I found myself searching for a new charity fundraiser, which I’ll touch on below.

Work on your own goals

The thing I’ve found with fitness and exercise is that, you don’t have to follow what everybody else is doing. You can particulate in any shape of sport or exercise at your own pace and do what works for you. It’s always good to set yourself little challenges but there’s no need to compare to anybody else’s lengths, times, and strength. For me, feeling stronger starts mentally. Using exercise to take away irrelevant or low thoughts, especially on this running journey, as it’s something which has significantly changed my outlook on things.

I find myself feeling accomplished at the end of each run. I am determined and more focused on positive things e.g. doing things for me and trying to less critical of my appearance and how I am. It’s a way for me to keep active, explore the outdoors (great for my photography page), and release any negative energy. All of these benefits and more make it worth the while, donating for a good cause at the same time.

100 for 100 challenge

My current challenge, running 100k for £100 has been pleasing so far. I’m so thankful for my amazing 22 supporters who have helped me to exceed my fundraising target already. Here’s to 20th July when I will have completed the full distance, in time to commemorate grandad’s heavenly birthday on 22nd July.

All donations are sent to The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association, in memory of my grandad and all of those who have/had visual impairments. For more information visit my JustGiving page.